Hair / Mid End

Dry Shampoo Showdown | Klorane v. Klorane

full disclosure press sample disclaimer

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Perspective is a funny thing, especially when it suddenly—without warning—changes. Think Copernicus trying to convince everyone that the earth was not the center of the universe and being totally ignored (haters!), until the general populace was like “oh just kidding, you’re right.”

College! I’m learning things.

All this is to say that until the day a mysterious Klorane package landed on my porch, I believed this to be the cardinal rule of dry shampoos: you either get a formula that feels a bit icky in your hair but works, or you get one that feels weightless and doesn’t do diddly squat. Wrong, wrong, wrong. 

Let’s begin with the brand’s cult classic original formula, which uses a blend of starches (corn and rice) plus natural absorbent microspheres to soak up those second day oils. It contains oat milk to soothe the scalp, and is super gentle—hypoallergenic, paraben-free, sulfate-free, and suitable for all hair types. The scent is most easily described as pleasant and nicely unobtrusive, a little bit powdery and creamy-sweet. What I love most about this formula is what it does for my bangs. For those of you who haven’t tried the annoyingly high-maintenance fringe, it’s a style that requires daily shampoos—unless you hit it with a good dose of dry shampoo in the morning and fluff it out with a brush. For the rest of my head, I like to spritz the crown and sides, flip my head over, and work my fingers through my hair. Instant volume, no more oily part. Best of all, it’s truly weightless, to the point where I occasionally dry shampoo on third day hair because I think it’s second day hair. I can see why SJP and almost every blogger I’ve run across are fans.

For those who need even more oil control, Klorane’s new nettle formula (read more about it here) should do the trick. It uses the same basic blend of ingredients as the original formula, but substitutes nettle extract for oat milk, which helps regulate sebum production in the scalp. Fun fact: Klorane did a pharmacological study where they found that the formula absorbed sebum as quickly as 25 seconds after application. That’s less time than it takes me to sit up in bed every morning! And like its gentler twin, the nettle version is both fantastically weightless and very lightly scented.

So which should you buy? I’d recommend the oat milk formula for those with normal-oily hair, while those with overzealous oil glands should probably go for the nettle version. Either way, your morning styling routine will thank you.

Klorane Dry Shampoo with Oat Milk is available in 1.06 oz ($7.50) and 3.2 oz ($18) cans, plus a non-aerosol 1.7 oz ($18) version. Their Dry Shampoo with Nettle comes in the 3.2 oz size ($18) only.

Do you dry shampoo? Which formula is your favorite?

Full Disclosure: The products featured in this post were submitted by PR for editorial consideration. For more information on my review policy, please refer to my disclaimer.

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16 thoughts on “Dry Shampoo Showdown | Klorane v. Klorane

  1. Haha “overzealous oil glands:” that’s mine! I have tried both and I prefer the nettle one, because it seems to give my roots more of a lift. The oatmilk one is also really good though! I love how they don’t turn my hair into a tangled, rouge mess, like what most dry shampoos do!

  2. Oh gosh I have a small size of the oatmilk one that’s been sitting there for almost ages. For some reason I’m a bit scared of dry shampoo, afraid it’ll turn my hair whitish (I guess those were the old formulas). I know I should, I know I should… :)

    • You must try! I have black hair so everything leaves a white cast on my hair when I first spray it (this does too), but I just give my hair a good run-through with my fingers to disperse it.

  3. I wish we get more brands of dry shampoos here. I’ve tried the budget Batiste version and also the more expensive Fudge. Batiste leaves a powdery feel to the hair compared to the latter. I want to try Klorane too, but I’d only get the chance if I visit Singapore one day. Thanks for the comparison so I know what to get when I’m there!

  4. College! More learny facts please. :D

    My hair and scalp tend to be on the dry side so I rarely need dry shampoos, but I am thinking of cutting bangs so this is good to know! Klorane looks like such a nice brand but I always tend to forget about it for some reason.

  5. Definitely nettle for me! I’d go crazy if Klorane is sold here. We only have the overpriced options at Sephora to choose from, Oscar Blandi and some other brands that begin with 3 digit figures.

    Hold on, girly, does it leave a white cast?

    • Tried Oscar Blandi before, was not impressed. It’s the one dry shampoo I’ve used that didn’t leave white cast on my hair (the transparent version), but it did absolutely nothing for me and my hair smelled like citrus household cleaner ugh.

      Yes, it does leave a fine white cast on hair, but it’s easily taken care of just by shaking through at the crown with your fingers. Don’t even need to brush it out.

  6. Um…I could probably go for two weeks without washing my hair and no one would notice…and I can’t ever brush my hair…so this isn’t really for me, lol. But on the very rare occasion that I straighten my hair, well then this would be my JAM haha ;)

  7. Check ebay to buy Klorane. Several vendors ship worldwide and the cost is still comparable to over the counter, even including shipping.

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